No Pugs

they're evil

typo

Unable to login after upgrade from typo 5.1.3 to 5.3 via git

Upgrading via a git merge might not be the best way of upgrading typo. The safest way is probably to follow the instructions in the UPGRADE file. However, I have a few modifications I've made to Typo that I'd like to preserve.

So I went ahead and merged 5_3_0 with my 5.1.3 branch and ran a db:migrate

I couldn't log in anymore. It turns out a "status" column is added to the users table in a migration, and in the same migration, each existing user's status is set to "active"

The problem is that after a db:migrate, the status column was still NULL. What happens is that it works if you run 1 migration at a time. But if you run the migration that adds and sets the status column to "active" in the same rake invocation that has already accessed the User class, it will already have the old columns loaded into it and will not think the "status" column even exists.

To fix it, you need to issue a User.reset_column_information after adding the column.

This column is not the only problem column, the "text_filter_id" and "editor" column also failed to update.

Below is a quick patch I made from my typo repository. I only went back to the migrations I was missing between 5.1.3 and 5.3 and made sure any model classes that were used had "reset_column_information" called before using. If you are going to attempt upgrading your typo blog via a git merge/pull, this patch might be useful.

0001-Changed-some-recent-migrations-to-call.patch

A note about an oddity I ran into when running these migrations in a production environment: You'll need to set config.cache_classes in config/environments/production.rb to false while running the migrations, otherwise it might try to preload information about classes whose tables don't yet exist. I'm not exactly sure why this happens, I've never had this problem in the past.

Published on 12/02/2009 at 10:08PM under , .

How to migrate typo from mysql to postgresql

I almost always use postgresql when working on a rails application. I won’t list all the little reasons why, but a major reason is for transactional DDL statements, which means when I run a migration that fails, I don’t have to then go run a bunch of cleanup queries to get my database back to how it was before the migration was ran.

When I was setting up this instance of typo, I decided I’d go ahead and go with mysql since I didn’t plan to hack on typo very much. Long story short: I decided to migrate from mysql to postgresql. This howto was done with mysql 5.0.70, postgresql 8.3.5, and typo 5.1.3 It probably will work with any mysql 5+ and postgresql 8+.

In case anybody else out there might be interested in doing likewise, here’s how I did it. These steps will be for a production database, but the changes required for doing it to a development database should be obvious.

Step 0: Backup your data

You don’t really need to be told this, do you?

Step 1: Dump the data from mysql

run the following to dump the data.

mysqldump --compatible=postgresql --no-create-info -u root -p --skip-extended-insert --complete-insert --skip-opt typo > typo.dump 

We are only dumping the data, hence the –no-create-info option.

Step 2: Create your postgresql database

You can do this however you see fit. I’ve included how I do it in case it’s useful:

CREATE USER typo_prod;
CREATE DATABASE typo_prod OWNER typo_prod ENCODING 'utf8';

\password typo_prod

and enter the password you wish to use.

Step 3: Change your database.yml to use your new postgresql database

Again, do this however you want. Here’s my database.yml with passwords omitted:

defaults: &defaults
  database: typo
  adapter: postgresql
  encoding: utf8
  host: localhost
  password: 

development:
  username: typo_dev
  database: typo_dev
  <<: *defaults

test:
  username: typo_test
  database: typo_test
  <<: *defaults

production:
  username: typo_prod
  database: typo_prod
  password: 
  host: salmon
  <<: *defaults

Step 4: Create the schema in your new database

To do this we’ll run the db:migrate rake task

RAILS_ENV="production" rake db:migrate

Step 5: Fire up a rails console to fix stuff

Now we need to fire up a rails console to do a lot of necessary cleanup work before we can import our data

ruby script/console production

Once it’s ready to go, type (or more practically, copy pasta)

conn = ActiveRecord::Base.connection

We’ll need this for a lot of the commands we have yet to run. You’ll keep this console open for the remainder of this howto. Any ruby code you see in this document will go into this console.

Step 6: Remove data created during the migrations

The typo migrations automatically add some default data, like some default pages/articles/blog. All of the data we want is in the dump we created earlier. Let’s delete all this stuff that’s in the way

conn.tables.each do |table|
  conn.execute "delete from #{table}"
end

Step 7: Temporarily change boolean columns to integers

mysqldump dumps it’s booleans as 0/1. These are interpreted by postgres as integers. It will not automatically cast these into booleans just because the column is boolean (I’m not sure why.) It’s too time consuming to go add casts to all of these 0/1’s, and a regular expression to use with sed would be far too complex to bother with since not all 1’s and 0’s in the dump correspond to boolean data.

So, we will temporarily change the boolean columns in our shiny new database to integers. Before we do this, we need to temporarily drop the defaults for these boolean columns because there won’t be an implicit cast from false/true to 0/1.

This code will build a couple of hashes to store which columns are booleans and what the defaults are.

bools = {}
defaults = {}


conn.tables.each do |table|
  conn.columns(table).each do |col|
    if col.type.to_s == "boolean"
      (bools[table] ||= []) << col.name
      (defaults[table] ||= {})[col.name] = col.default if !col.default.nil?
    end
  end
end

here’s the value of bools and defaults in my console after the above code:

#bools
{"resources"=>["itunes_metadata", "itunes_explicit"], "contents"=>["published", 
"allow_pings", "allow_comments"], "users"=>["notify_via_email", 
"notify_on_new_articles", "notify_on_comments", "notify_watch_my_articles", 
"notify_via_jabber"], "feedback"=>["published", "status_confirmed"], 
"categorizations"=>["is_primary"]}
#defaults
{"contents"=>{"published"=>false}, "feedback"=>{"published"=>false}}

Let’s now temporarily drop the defaults

defaults.each_pair do |table,cols|
  cols.each_key do |col|
    conn.execute "alter table #{table} alter column #{col} DROP DEFAULT"      
  end
end

Now let’s alter the column types for the columns in bools.

We’ll use a closure to run the alter statements, so that we can use it again later to alter them back to booleans.

change_to_type = proc {|to_type|
  bools.each_pair do |table, cols|
    cols.each do |col|
      conn.execute "alter table #{table} alter column #{col} type #{to_type} 
                                USING (#{col}::#{to_type});"
    end
  end
}

change_to_type.call :integer

Step 8: Load the data dump into the new database

Ah, finally. Let’s load the data. Back to a shell in a directory with the dump, run:

sed "s/\\\'/\'\'/g" typo.dump | sed "s/\\\r/\r/g" | sed "s/\\\n/\n/g" | psql -1 typo_prod

Pass whatever options you need to connect to psql as you normally would. The first sed converts all of the \’ to two consecutive ‘s, which is what psql expects. The next two calls to sed in the pipeline replace the escaped carriage returns and newlines with actual carriage returns and newlines, which is again what psql expects.

You may get a couple warnings, but hopefully no errors. The few warnings I received were inconsequential.

Step 9: Change the boolean columns back to boolean and restore the default columns

Back to our rails console. We now have the data in place and can change the columns back using our closure from earlier:

change_to_type.call :boolean

And then restore the defaults we dropped:

defaults.each_pair do |table, cols|
  cols.each_pair do |col, default|
    conn.execute "alter table #{table} alter column #{col} SET DEFAULT #{default}"
  end
end

Step 10: Repair the sequences.

Another annoying aspect of postgresql is that inserting a value into a serial column doesn’t automatically advance the sequence to be ready to serve up an unused value. There will be a sequence called “#{table}idseq” for each table with an id column in the database.

We manually have to advance all of the sequences:

conn.tables.each do |table|
  if conn.columns(table).detect{|i|i.name == "id"}
    conn.execute "SELECT setval('#{table}_id_seq', (SELECT max(id) FROM #{table}))"
  end
end

Conclusion

So that should do it. Restart your mongrel cluster (or whatever you are using to manage your rails server processes) and you should now be using your blog with a postgresql backend!

Published on 01/04/2009 at 11:44PM under , , , .

using permalinks to access articles without specifying the date in typo

I recently switched from mephisto to typo, mostly due to lack of activity and features in the mephisto project.

With mephisto, I had to make a modification to allow me to use permalinks without the date to access articles. For example, so I could say http://nopugs.com/permalinks-without-dates instead of http://nopugs.com/2008/09/11/permalinks-without-dates I’m not sure why this isn’t already a feature of such blogging systems. I’m somewhat new to blogging so perhaps there’s a good reason. Maybe there are sometimes different articles with the same permalink (I don’t know why somebody would do this.)

Regardless, here’s how I modified typo to allow me to do this.

In app/controllers/redirect_controller.rb change the redirect method from this:

 def redirect
    if (params[:from].first == 'articles')
      path = request.path.sub('/articles', '')
      url_root = request.relative_url_root
      path = url_root + path unless url_root.nil?
      redirect_to path, :status => 301
      return
    end

    r = Redirect.find_by_from_path(params[:from].join("/"))

    if(r)
      path = r.to_path
      url_root = request.relative_url_root
      path = url_root + path unless url_root.nil? or path[0,url_root.length] == url_root
      redirect_to path, :status => 301
    else
      render :text => "Page not found", :status => 404
    end
  end

to this:

  def redirect
    if (params[:from].first == 'articles')
      path = request.path.sub('/articles', '')
      url_root = request.relative_url_root
      path = url_root + path unless url_root.nil?
      redirect_to path, :status => 301
      return
    end
   
    article = Article.find_by_permalink(params[:from].first)
   
    if article
      redirect_to article_path(article)
      return
    end

    r = Redirect.find_by_from_path(params[:from].join("/"))

    if(r)
      path = r.to_path
      url_root = request.relative_url_root
      path = url_root + path unless url_root.nil? or path[0,url_root.length] == url_root
      redirect_to path, :status => 301
    else
      render :text => "Page not found", :status => 404
    end
  end

Then in app/models/article.rb change findbypermalink from this:

  def self.find_by_permalink(year, month=nil, day=nil, title=nil)
    unless month
      case year
      when Hash
        year, month, day, title = date_from(year)
      when Array
        year, month, day, title = year
      end
    end
    date_range = self.time_delta(year, month, day)
    find_published(:first,
                   :conditions => { :permalink => title,
                                    :published_at => date_range }) \
      or raise ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound
  end

to this:

  def self.find_by_permalink(year, month=nil, day=nil, title=nil)
    unless month
      case year
      when Hash
        year, month, day, title = date_from(year)
      when Array
        year, month, day, title = year
      end
    end
    
    if year && !month && !day && !title
      year, title = title, year
    end
    
    published = nil
    
    if year
      date_range = self.time_delta(year, month, day)
      published = find_published(:first,
        :conditions => { :permalink => title,
          :published_at => date_range }) 
    end
    
    unless published
      published = find_published(:first, :conditions => {:permalink => title})
    end
      
    raise ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound unless published
    published
  end

Then you should be able to leave the year/month/day off of your article URLs when sharing them with friends and such.

Enjoy!

Published on 09/11/2008 at 06:59PM under .

Powered by Typo – Thème Frédéric de Villamil | Photo Glenn